Virulent Rhetorics: HIV and the Politics of Digital Sexual Health

What happens when we treat the everyday discourses of queer and trans people of color (QTPOC) on social media in relation to their sexual health as a valid, intra-community form of health knowledge and meaning making? To answer this question, Virulent Rhetorics: HIV and the Politics of Digital Sexual Health analyzes social media data of QTPOC intaking sexual health information, gestating it within the purview of their unique experiences, and circulating it as enriched knowledge to other users along the lines of queer of color sensibilities. Virulent Rhetorics argues via a rhetorical analysis of archival materials that such digital communication sequences grassroots traditions of how queer and trans communities of color informed each other of critical information amid the height of the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s and 90s. Ultimately, Virulent Rhetorics forwards an eponymous rhetorical concept that actuates a community-based framework of health literacy, rendering communicative events across social media as epistemologically valid health literacy acts.